8 Toxic Leadership Styles To Avoid If You Want To Succeed

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A toxic leader is someone who creates a hostile work environment and causes his or her employees to feel stressed, anxious, and undervalued. Toxic leaders are often paranoid, micro-manage their employees, and take credit for the work of others. If you want to be a successful leader, it’s important to avoid these 8 toxic leadership styles.

There is no one perfect leadership style. The best leaders are those who can adapt their style to the situation and the people they are leading. However, some leadership styles are more likely to lead to failure than others.

These so-called toxic leadership styles can have a negative impact on both the leader and the people they are supposed to be leading. They can lead to a breakdown in communication, mistrust, and conflict. In extreme cases, they can even lead to violence.

So, if you want to be a successful leader, make sure you avoid these 8 toxic leadership styles!

8 Toxic Leadership Styles

images of leaders representing toxic leadership.
  1. Perfectionist
  2. Bully
  3. Workaholic
  4. Egotist
  5. Micromanager
  6. Narcissist
  7. Know-it-all
  8. Yes-man/woman

The Perfectionist

A perfectionist leader is one who always wants things to be done perfectly. They may have high standards, but they expect others to meet those standards perfectly as well.

This leadership style can be toxic in two ways. First, it can create a lot of stress for the leader and the people they are leading. Secondly, it can lead to a lot of wasted time and effort as people try to meet the impossible standards set by the leader.

The bully

This is the leader who likes to use their position of power to intimidate others. They may shout, threaten, or use physical violence to get their way. This is a classic toxic leadership style because it creates a hostile work environment.

People are scared to speak up or challenge the leader. This can lead to poor decision-making, as the leader is not getting honest feedback.

The workaholic

The workaholic leader is one who is always working. They may be obsessed with their work, or they may simply feel like they have to work all the time to be successful. This leadership style is toxic because it sets a bad example for the people the leader is supposed to be leading. It can also lead to burnout, as the leader is not taking time to rest and recharge. Such leaders expect their teams to be working long hours too.

The egotist

This is a leader who is always talking about themselves. They may be boastful, arrogant, and insensitive to the needs of others. This leadership style is toxic because it alienates the people the leader is supposed to be leading. It can also lead to bad decision-making, as the leader is more interested in their own needs than the needs of the people they are supposed to be leading.

The micromanager

Micromanagers like to control everything. They may be afraid of delegation, or they may simply want to be in control. This leadership style is toxic because it stifles creativity and innovation. It can also lead to frustration and resentment, as people feel like they are not being allowed to do their jobs.

The narcissist

Narcissist leaders are obsessed with themselves. They may be charming and charismatic, but they are also manipulative and self-centred.

This leadership style is toxic because it can lead to a cult of personality. People may be drawn to the leader, but they will eventually become disillusioned. The leader is more interested in their own power and prestige than the people they are supposed to be leading.

The know-it-all

This is the leader who always has to be right. They may be closed-minded and inflexible, or they may simply be unable to admit they are wrong. This toxic leadership style inhibits learning and growth at work. The know-it-all leader is not open to new ideas, and they are not willing to learn from their mistakes.

The yes-man/woman

Such leaders always agree with their boss. They may be afraid of conflict, or they may simply want to be seen as a team player. This leadership style is toxic because it prevents honest dialogue. The leader is not willing to stand up for their own beliefs, and they are not willing to challenge the boss. This can lead to bad decision-making, as the leader is not considering all the options.

Conclusion: 8 Toxic Leadership Styles

Leadership is a complex and multi-faceted skill that can take years to master. And, even then, there’s always room for improvement. One way to continue honing your leadership skills is to seek feedback from those you work with.

Now, this isn’t always easy. It can be difficult to hear criticism, even when it’s constructive. But, by soliciting feedback and taking it to heart, you can make adjustments to your leadership style that will benefit both you and your team. Regular, honest feedback is the best way to avoid these common toxic leadership styles.

So, how can you go about seeking feedback in a way that’s productive? Here are a few tips:

  • Be open to hearing feedback, good or bad.
  • Ask specific questions about what people think of your leadership style.
  • Seek feedback from a variety of sources, including your team, your boss, and your
  • peers.
  • Take the time to reflect on the feedback you receive and make changes if necessary.

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By BMB Staff

Business Management Blog is your online resource for business management and strategy articles, insights, ideas and tools. We talk about Business Management, Strategy, Customer Experience, Employee Engagement, Leadership and Career Growth. Subscribe to the blog to get updates about new posts.

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